East Coast Transplant. West Coast Love.

I like to post pictures of shoes, animals, things relating to Los Angeles, and anything else I find amusing and/or pretty.

I am a cat lady and I'll say that loud and proud. I also own a dog and she has made me a rather fierce advocate for pit bulls. I also like to rant about driving.
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Anonymous asked: Hello BuzzFeed! What is your favorite sport? Mine's hockey!

buzzfeed:

Opinions vary, but a lot of us are fond of Turkish oil wrestling. It’s the national sport of Turkey!

That gif is mesmerizing omg

Love this skirt
(via Rosie | vivianchan)

Love this skirt

(via Rosie | vivianchan)

mymodernmet:

Photographer Bobby-Jo Clow found herself face-to-face with a cheetah cub who approached her Landrover while on safari at the Serengeti National Park in Tanzania. She documented the curious cat’s looks of wonder and trepidation at the vehicle and its passengers.

Bucket list: African safari

latimes:

This is P-22, a mountain lion who has been living in L.A.’s Griffith Park for about two years. When Times reporter Martha Groves wrote about him in October, he was a healthy animal. The photo above was taken in March, after he’d been captured so he could be treated for mange. (Scientists learned he had the condition thanks to an image taken by a remote camera.)
After he was captured, P-22 was sedated and blood samples were taken; they showed evidence of exposure to rat poison. From Groves’ latest report:

Now, researchers say they suspect a link between the poisons and the mange, a parasitic skin disease that causes crusting and skin lesions and has contributed to the deaths of scores of bobcats and coyotes. A National Park Service biologist applied a topical treatment for mange and injected Vitamin K to offset the effects of poisoning.
The condition of California’s famous cougar is likely to intensify the debate over the use of rat poisons in areas of the state where urban living collides with nature.

There have been efforts to discourage the use of so-called “second-generation” rodenticides in California, and recently the state’s Department of Pesticide Regulation moved to disallow their sale to the general public. But P-22 was afflicted by two older “first-generation” rat poisons, Groves notes.
Below, P-22 in happier times:

Photo: National Park Service. Video: Los Angeles Times

poor guy :(

latimes:

This is P-22, a mountain lion who has been living in L.A.’s Griffith Park for about two years. When Times reporter Martha Groves wrote about him in October, he was a healthy animal. The photo above was taken in March, after he’d been captured so he could be treated for mange. (Scientists learned he had the condition thanks to an image taken by a remote camera.)

After he was captured, P-22 was sedated and blood samples were taken; they showed evidence of exposure to rat poison. From Groves’ latest report:

Now, researchers say they suspect a link between the poisons and the mange, a parasitic skin disease that causes crusting and skin lesions and has contributed to the deaths of scores of bobcats and coyotes. A National Park Service biologist applied a topical treatment for mange and injected Vitamin K to offset the effects of poisoning.

The condition of California’s famous cougar is likely to intensify the debate over the use of rat poisons in areas of the state where urban living collides with nature.

There have been efforts to discourage the use of so-called “second-generation” rodenticides in California, and recently the state’s Department of Pesticide Regulation moved to disallow their sale to the general public. But P-22 was afflicted by two older “first-generation” rat poisons, Groves notes.

Below, P-22 in happier times:

Photo: National Park Service. Video: Los Angeles Times

poor guy :(

Hiking on Easter Sunday because we’re godless heathens

Most people are going to church and seeing family. We go for an 8 mile hike. 💐

Most people are going to church and seeing family. We go for an 8 mile hike. 💐

newsweek:

Most children, Asher Svidensky says, are a little intimidated by golden eagles.
Kazakh boys in western Mongolia start learning how to use the huge birds to hunt for foxes and hares at the age of 13, when the eagles sit heavily on their undeveloped arms.
Svidensky, a photographer and travel writer, shot five boys learning the skill - and he also photographed Ashol-Pan.
"To see her with the eagle was amazing," he recalls. She was a lot more comfortable with it, a lot more powerful with it and a lot more at ease with it."
A 13-year-old eagle huntress in Mongolia

This girl is cooler then you’ll ever be

newsweek:

Most children, Asher Svidensky says, are a little intimidated by golden eagles.

Kazakh boys in western Mongolia start learning how to use the huge birds to hunt for foxes and hares at the age of 13, when the eagles sit heavily on their undeveloped arms.

Svidensky, a photographer and travel writer, shot five boys learning the skill - and he also photographed Ashol-Pan.

"To see her with the eagle was amazing," he recalls. She was a lot more comfortable with it, a lot more powerful with it and a lot more at ease with it."

A 13-year-old eagle huntress in Mongolia

This girl is cooler then you’ll ever be

My dog is so beautiful… 😜🐶💘

My dog is so beautiful… 😜🐶💘

P < 0.05

whatshouldwecallgradschool:

image

credit: Kylee

almost pissed myself laughing

gettyimages:

Blood Moon
TOP: MIAMI, FL - APRIL 15: The moon is seen during a total lunar eclipse on April 15, 2014 in Miami, Florida. People in most of north and south America should be able to witness this year’s first total lunar eclipse, which will cause a ‘blood moon’ and is the first of four in a rare Tetrad of eclipses over the next two years. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Bottom:
VENICE, CA - APRIL 15: (EDITORS NOTE: Image is a digital composite.) The moon is seen as it nears a total lunar eclipse on April 15, 2015 in Venice, California. People in most of north and south America should be able to witness the year’s first total lunar eclipse, which will cause a ‘blood moon’ and is the first of four in a rare Tetrad of eclipses over the next two years. (Photo by Rich Polk/Getty Images)

More images HERE

Stayed up past midnight to see it. It was cool